A Stellar Find; The Cliff Beach Club

One of the many free range chickens

One of the many free range chickens

The local transportation is cheap and plentiful, so we took advantage of it.  For $1 US ($2 Barbados) we took the bus from Dover Beach to Holetown.   Holetown is on the west coast and has some high end shops, including Cartier and Louis Vuitton.   We walked through a small shopping center called Chattel House, which was very pretty, but very expensive.

Chattel House shopping area in Holetown, Barbados

Chattel House shopping area in Holetown, Barbados

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Many of the local houses are brightly painted

Many of the local houses are brightly painted

We had packed our backpacks with swimsuits and towels.  We headed southbound along the beach from Holetown.

We made our way southbound along the beach starting in Holetown

We made our way southbound along the beach starting in Holetown

The boardwalk area had some high end restaurants right along the shore

The boardwalk area had some high end restaurants right along the shore

A restaurant along the boardwalk

A restaurant along the boardwalk

The beaches here are not long stretches of white sand, but rather short sandy crescents, divided by rocky outcrops.   As we made our way southbound along the beach, we navigated through sand, the boardwalk, rocks with barely any sand, and then a few wide beaches.  The waves were stronger so the surfers were out.

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The beaches we walked along in sequence southbound were: Folkestone, Sandy Lane, and Payne’s Beach.  The west coast was definitely more ritzy than the south coast.

Sandy Lane Bay

Sandy Lane Bay

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Some of the coastline we walked had barely any sand at all. The beaches and coastline are all open to the public, although some large homes' seawalls reach right to the sea.

Some of the coastline we walked had barely any sand at all. The beaches and coastline are all open to the public, although some large homes’ property reaches right to the sea.

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As sometimes happens, out of pure good luck we stumbled upon a true gem walking along the beach.   Feeling the need to stop for lunch, we found The Cliff Beach Club.  It has one of the best views I’ve ever seen (rivals Two Oceans at Cape of Good Hope) and was the best meal so far of the trip.   I would not miss this if I ever return to Barbados.

We stopped for lunch at The Cliff Beach Club

We stopped for lunch at The Cliff Beach Club

All the tables have a spectacular view

All the tables have a spectacular view

The best meal so far

The best meal so far

View from the bar at The Cliff Beach Club

View from the bar at The Cliff Beach Club

bar-glasses

 

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After lunch, we hopped another bus for $1 US back to the south coast.

The colors of the sunset

The colors of the sunset

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Barbados

Turtle Beach, Barbados

Turtle Beach, Barbados

My sister and I arrived in Barbados on Valentine’s Day.  Yet another romantic destination with my sister, oh well, no romance but a few days of relaxation.

This is the first time I have booked an “all inclusive” resort.   There is no end to the number of resorts here in Barbados, so we just picked one.   We are staying at the Turtle Beach by Elegance Hotels on the southern side of the island, an area called Dover Beach.

Turtle Beach looking west

Turtle Beach looking west

“All inclusive” is not my usual style (I prefer small boutique B&B’s), but we thought we’d try it for a change.  We found out upon arrival that the all inclusive is indeed truly all inclusive.  You can’t turn around without a staff member pushing a rum drink into your hand.

Me on Turtle Beach shortly after our arrival

Me on Turtle Beach shortly after our arrival

We made ourselves at home on the pretty beach, with some fairly large waves and endless rum drinks.

Getting close to sunset

Getting close to sunset

One of the many rum drinks we sampled.

One of the many rum drinks we sampled.

Our first full day we were up early and decided to walk along the beach towards St. Lawrence Gap.  We ended up walking almost three hours, the distance from Dover Beach to very nearly Bridgetown.

Very cool tiles inlaid into the side walk.

Very cool tiles inlaid into the sidewalk.

Sidewalk tile closeup

Sidewalk tile closeup

We couldn’t stay along the beach for the entire walk, but followed the beach where we could, along the roads when we had to, and then walked the boardwalk when we reached that point.

St. Lawrence Gap early in the morning.

St. Lawrence Gap early in the morning.

Me on Carib Beach

Me on Carib Beach

Barbados, to my eyes, is a lot like the other Caribbean islands I have visited, (loose chickens everywhere, rusted rebar protruding from abandoned half completed building projects, and very friendly people) but with fewer stray dogs.  We saw quite a few cats, but only two dogs.  I was surprised to see some run down and abandoned properties along the beach front, beside very expensive hotels.

A pretty fence along the road

A pretty fence along the road

We ended up walking what we think was about 2 to 2 1/2 miles.  We started out in a light rain, and ended in bright, warm, sunny weather.

Near Worthing

Near Worthing

We saw turtle signs but no turtles

We saw turtle signs but no turtles

Pretty private homes along the beach near Rockley

Pretty private homes along the beach near Rockley

An unlikely bus stop

An unlikely bus stop

We ended our walk at St. Ann’s Fort right outside the Bridgetown Hilton.  From there we jumped into one of the many local minibuses (collectivo) and got a ride back to Dover Beach for $1 US each ($2 Barbados dollars).

The boardwalk ran along the beach from about Accra Beach to Hastings Beach

The boardwalk ran along the beach from about Accra Beach to Hastings Beach

St. Ann's Fort just south of Bridgetown, Barbados

St. Ann’s Fort just south of Bridgetown, Barbados

All the local people we have spoken with have been very friendly and kind.  The stray cats are all friendly, unafraid, which means no one is harming them.  People offer help even when not asked.  A guy with dreadlocks in the local market proffered a fist for a fist bump and said “Chill out man, you’re in Barbados.”   We are taking his advice and are chilling out.   Just what my sister needed, coming from the frosty NW.

 

 

 

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A Pagan Looks at Christmas

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Even though I do not consider myself a religious person, (spiritual but not religious), I do enjoy the Christmas season.  As are nearly all Scandinavians, I was baptized a Lutheran, and attended Sunday School as a child.  But today I consider myself a Naturalist/Pagan, (I believe in Science, the power of nature and Mother Earth.   I also like the idea of Evolutionary Humanism, which requires people to consider their moral principles free from religious beliefs.)

This is the first time in the past ten years that I have been able to travel home to Oregon for the holidays.  It was very nice to be home with family and in cooler temperatures than Florida for this time of year.

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I’ve always maintained that Christians stole a great pagan holiday and turned it into Christmas.  In a book from my mother’s collection, The Book of Christmas, a Time-Life publication from 1986, I have found a description of the history of Christmas in a comprehensive and entertaining way, and with great illustrations.  The quotations below are all from that book.

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My holiday card says “Happy Winter Solstice”, the turning point of winter when the days become longer once again.  “Solstice” means “sun stands still.”  In the time before Christ, the winter solstice celebration wasn’t just a party, as I have liked to imagine.  Thousands of years ago “…people knew the sun as a god, the provider of light and warmth and life.  In late December, the god offered only a brief daily showing…yet in the days that followed, the god fought back against the encroaching darkness, slowly winning through to the midsummer months, when the sun’s golden brightness blazed high in the heavens.”

Until quite recently in human history, people didn’t understand the rotation of the earth or the changing of the seasons as we do now.  The people believed they had a part in the entire process and “… that the sun and light were truly endangered at the solstice.  The earth trembled under the footsteps of the dead, and unless the living offered prayers and performed ceremonies, death would triumph:  There would be no return of summer.”

So in the north – the Celts, Scandinavians, etc – performed rituals “…to ensure the rebirth of the sun.  They adorned their houses and themselves with holly and ivy and mistletoe and evergreen – all of the plants that withstood the death of winter and so were charged with enchanting power.”  These early survivors believed not just that the sun may not return, but also feared that the dark held evil creatures such as witches, spirits, and demons.  So they used fire to fight the darkness.

“Fire was at the center of all the winter festivals.  It was the brother of the sun, calling out to the heavens.  Great bonfires blazed on the hills of Ireland and Scotland, on the mountains of France and Germany and in the halls of the Norse kings.”

There were many festivals in the darkest time of the year; Brumalia, Saturnalia, Samain and the Yule of the Norsemen, originally in November.  Saturnalia ended on December 24th and December 25th was the birthday of the god Mithra.  All of the ceremonies “…were intimately concerned with the great natural crisis that reached its acme on the day of the sun’s shortest and feeblest appearance.”

The story of the birth of Jesus, the miracle of the star, the angels descending from the heavens, was “…the whole of the chronicle.  The rest is garlands, added by subsequent ages – by monks, scribes, priests, wits, storytellers and common people – to adorn the source of the faith that was their life’s greatest treasure.  Nothing from the time portrays Joseph, the shepherds, the inn, the innkeepers.  The year itself is in doubt, and the time of year a topic merely for speculation…It would be some three hundred years before the date of the birth was fixed by the elders of the new religion and Christmas was set at the 25th of December.  The reasons for the choice are not difficult to discover:  Even a brief glimpse at the stories told about Mary shows how the event was to become the crowning symbol of a thousand years of ritual and custom.”

“All of these rites were gathered at last under the mantle of the Christian celebration and while the origins were forgotten, traces of the old ceremonies remained…The child who was the Son of God and called the sun of righteousness promised delivery from darkness and the hope of everlasting life.”

As we bring in our Christmas trees and decorate with lights, we are hearkening back to the days before Christ.  But don’t call a Christmas tree a holiday tree around some uptight folks.  They say “keep the Christ in Christmas”, even though to me a Christmas Tree isn’t as accurate as holiday tree.  But to truly celebrate Christmas (Christ’s Mass) in the original sense of the powerful and consequential event of the birth of the Savior, the son of God, (in my humble opinion) there would be no trees or gifts or the buying frenzy we see so much of today.  It would be a solemn, contemplative celebration, a time to relive and revive faith in a miracle.  Today’s commercialization of Christmas is tragic, and I feel that most people in the US are not celebrating it in a religious fashion.  It seems to be a mix of many traditions, which is why I claim to celebrate the older customs, the changing of the seasons, and the return of the sun.

Saint Martin as depicted by Michael Hague

Saint Martin as depicted by Michael Hague

There were many Christian saints who had magical powers.  One of those was Saint Martin, whose saints day is November 11th.  Saint Martin was the patron of wine and of vintners, who rode “…across meadows and fields on his white horse, releasing from the folds of his cloak the first snow of the season.  Saint Martin’s Day was one of feasting, when the first of the new wine was drunk.  And in memory of his patronage, German children placed vessels of water on the doorsteps with the plea that the water be changed to wine.  On the morning of Martinmas, the water would indeed be wine, beside it would lie a special cookie, shaped like a horseshoe to show that the saint had ridden by in the night.”

Michael Haute's version of Odin from the book The Book of Christmas

Michael Hauge’s version of Odin from the book The Book of Christmas

Another Christian Saint, Saint Nicholas, also has roots in the ancient gods.  Santa Claus’ origins can be traced to Odin the All-father, who rode through the skies in winter with a crowd of elves and spirits.

A Winter Solstice dance interpretation by Michael Hague

A Winter Solstice dance interpretation by Michael Hague

December 21, The Winter Solstice.  “From time before memory, people danced to make magic, and throughout Europe, they danced at the solstice as a defense against the dark.  The recollection of those early ceremonies lived on in the form of village sword dances, performed on the shortest of days, December 21.  Clothed in elaborate ribboned costumes, men would circle sunwise – from left to right, in the apparent path of the sun – using the swords they bore to form patterns in the air.  The most important pattern marked the climax of the dance.  It was a six-pointed star, the earthly symbol of the longed-for sun.”

 

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The following is an excerpt from an article written by Russell Sadler and printed in the Daily Astorian, possibly as long ago as a few decades.  My mother clipped it out and saved it all this time.

Our traditional view of Christmas comes from our English roots and our nation’s New England beginnings.  Christmas is enduring images of snow-covered countryside dotted with evergreens and horses drawing sleighs over white and drifting snow.   Grandmother’s house is over the river and through the woods.  Christmas is no place like home for the holidays by the hearth of a New England farmhouse.  A log fire blazing in a rock fireplace is required equipment.  Town is a country cross-roads with white clapboard churches whose spires reach toward the sky and snow-covered red barns in the background where the cattle are lowing.  These powerful images are perpetuated by the illustrations of the English emigrant artist Reginald Birch, illustrators Currier and Ives, painter Norman Rockwell and generations of artists at Hallmark cards.   But the most powerful influence on our traditional view of Christmas is the English journalist and author Charles Dickens.  The Christmas Americans find familiar and export to the world is not an age-old tradition.  It is only a slight exaggeration to argue that Charles Dickens invented Christmas in 1843 when he published A Christmas Carol in Prose, Being a Ghost Story of Christmas.  To put the event in perspective, Dickens published his influential story of Christmas Past, Christmas Present and Christmas Future the same year Jesse Applegate’s wagon train arrived in Oregon with 900 souls over the Oregon Trail, doubling the Oregon Territory’s European-American population overnight.  A Christmas Carol introduced Scrooge and Marley, Tiny Tim, Bob Cratchit and Mr. and Mrs. Fezziwig to the world.  On its pages we still find the Christmas we know and celebrate.  It is the Christmas of blazing Yule logs under cozy rooftops, the Christmas of plum puddings, smiles, gifts and happiness.  All the modern commercial Christmas glitz would have baffled Tiny Tim.  In Dickens’ pre-Christmas Carol England, Christmas was primarily a family feast at home on Christmas Day.  Dec. 25 marked the beginning of the Twelve Days of Christmas and the beginning of the celebration.  Gifts on Christmas morning were few and limited to the very young in all but the wealthiest Victorian families.  Christmas in Dickens’ day was followed by 12 days of exchanging small holiday notions, visiting, feasting, family games and joyous Christmas dances.  The emphasis was on people being together.  Today’s emphasis on ostentatious commercial consumption was conspicuous by its absence.

Norman Rockwell's Santa

A Norman Rockwell painting of Santa Claus

 

Of course things change with time, but I think it is past due for a return to a simpler and less commercial celebration, whether for religious reasons or others.  My family generally tries to get together for a meal, and does not go overboard with gifts.  My mother bakes traditional Scandinavian cookies and puts up a real Christmas tree.  This year the tree went up on Dec 23rd.  The days after Christmas, the traditional 12 days of Christmas, are quieter and more peaceful than the buildup to The Day.

Christmas dinner or salmon, potatoes, carrots, green beans and of course an nice Oregon Pinot Noir, Four Graces.

Christmas dinner of salmon, potatoes, carrots, green beans and of course a nice Oregon Pinot Noir, Four Graces.

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An old ornament

An old ornament

Another old ornament

Another old ornament

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Posted in Seasons & Holidays | 2 Comments

Merry Christmas & God Jul

These Christmas post cards are from my great grandmother Hanna’s collection

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This next post card has the traditional Swedish Christmas hymn, “We Greet Thee Beautiful Morning”, sung in Lutheran Churches, or at least it used to be sung 100 years ago.

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Hail, blessed morn! Sing and rejoice, O daughter of Zion; for behold, I come to 
dwell in you, says the Lord

 

This next one was sent from family in Sweden to my great grandmother in the US.

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angels

The angel with star post card was sent in 1905 from Sweden to my grandmother in California, who would have been 9 at the time.

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The next two postcards were sent in 1914 from my grandmother’s friends in California, to her in Oregon.

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I just received this Christmas card a few days ago from my cousin Laila in Sweden.

I just received this Christmas card a few days ago from my cousin Laila in Sweden.

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Colors of Christmas

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flowers

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candy

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Happy Halloween

 

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My Mother’s hand drawn Halloween card this year.

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Arcata Postcards, 1908 – 1909

Yosemite postcard, postmarked Dec 29 1908. The postcard was printed in Germany, sent to my Grandmother in Arcata, from a friend in Oakland.

Yosemite postcard, postmarked Dec 29 1908. The postcard was printed in Germany, sent to my Grandmother in Arcata, from a friend in Oakland.

Many of the older postcards in our collection, the ones from 1908 and 1909, are photographs of buildings and landmarks.  During these years my grandmother was in Arcata with her mother.  The address on the postcards have just her name and “Arcata Wharf, Arcata, California.”  My grandmother would have been 12 and 13 years old during those years.

This postcard sent to my grandmother from a little girlfriend in Korbel is postmarked Sept 21, 1908. I don't quite understand the message.

This postcard sent to my grandmother from a little girlfriend in Korbel is postmarked Sept 21, 1908. I don’t quite understand the message.

A souvenir from the 1909 Eureka Big Railroad Fair

A souvenir from the 1909 Eureka Big Railroad Fair

A photograph of Mariposa big Tree Groves, Yosemite National Park, California, turned into a postcard. It was also printed in Germany, and postmarked May 1909.

A photograph of Mariposa big Tree Groves, Yosemite National Park, California, turned into a postcard. It was also printed in Germany, and postmarked May 1909.

A beautiful birthday postcard from 1909. Part of the correspondence reads "tabby has kittens, we don't know where they are."

A beautiful birthday postcard from 1909. Part of the correspondence reads “tabby has kittens, we don’t know where they are.”

This postcard was sent in early December 1909.

This postcard was sent in early December 1909.

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Arcata Postcards, 1910 – 1911

One of my favorites from the collection. This postcard is dated Feb. 1911. It was sent from Korbel CA to Arcata, CA, with the request to "come up next Saturday."

One of my favorites from the collection. This postcard is dated Feb. 1911. It was sent from Korbel CA to Arcata, CA, with the request to “come up next Saturday.”

Having recently spent some time in Eureka, California, it was interesting for me to go through a stack of old postcards from that area in my mother’s possession.  My great grandmother Hannah worked at the Samoa Cookhouse, near Arcata, in the early 1900s.  I recently visited the cookhouse for breakfast.  Her daughter Esther, my grandmother, attended the Arcata school for several years, and in 1910 when my she was 14 years old, her mother Hannah went to work as a cook at Haughey’s Camp in Kneeland Prairie.  Her daughter stayed in Arcata and lived with other families as a “helper.”  There are several postcards from daughter to mother starting in Aug. 1910, when my grandmother was only 14.  All the postcards were sent with a 1 cent stamp.  There are quite a few postcards to my grandmother from friends, some living as close as Korbel. Without a telephone, a postcard would have been a way to set up invitations and meetings, which was the content of many of the cards.

Post mark Jan 1910, send to my grandmother, 13 years old at the time. The address is simply; Arcata Wharf, Arcata, Calif.

Post mark Jan 1910, sent to my grandmother, 13 years old at the time. The address is simply; Arcata Wharf, Arcata, Calif.

May 1910 post mark. The postcard was printed in Germany.

May 1910 post mark. The postcard was printed in Germany.

In August 1910, my grandmother sent her mother this postcard. She tells her mother of taking herself to the dentist. She was 14 years old.

In August 1910, my grandmother sent her mother this postcard. She tells her mother of taking herself to the dentist. She was 14 years old.

A newsy postcard sent to my grandmother in Arcata from her friend in Korbel. It is dated Jan 1911. She tells of a neighbor who "have got a baby boy now and they think an awful lot of it."

A newsy postcard sent to my grandmother in Arcata from her friend in Korbel. It is dated Jan 1911. She tells of a neighbor who “have got a baby boy now and they think an awful lot of it.”

A 1911 Valentine. Sent from my grandmother to her mother.

A 1911 Valentine. Sent from my grandmother to her mother.

The postmark on this card is March 1911. My grandmother's friend writes "Come up this Friday night and we will go fishing Saturday morning."

The postmark on this card is March 1911. My grandmother’s friend writes “Come up this Friday night and we will go fishing Saturday morning.”

This postcard was sent from Arcata, CA to Portland, OR on Dec 24th, 1911. My grandmother's friend Elsie wishes her a Merry Xmas and Happy New Year.

This postcard was sent from Arcata, CA to Portland, OR on Dec 24th, 1911. My grandmother’s friend Elsie wishes her a Merry Xmas and Happy New Year.

There are many postcards saved from my grandmother’s years in Arcata.  These are some of my favorites from 1910 to 1911.  I’ll post the Christmas postcards in December.

 

Posted in California, Family | 1 Comment

Redwoods Road Trip Day 6. The Longest Ride

Lance captured this doe and fawn in Weed, early in the morning before we headed out

Lance captured this doe and fawn in Weed, early in the morning before we headed out

We rose pretty early on Sunday for the final stretch home.  Lance rose earliest and saw a doe and fawn near the house, capturing them on my camera.   When I popped out of bed to see them, they were gone.

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Russell cooked us breakfast and we geared up for the long ride.   Weed, CA to Portland, OR is approximately 350 miles, a 6 hour drive if taking I-5 the entire way home.  Jerome would be leaving the group here to continue south, but Russell rode with us almost to the Oregon border.

Gearing up for the last leg

Gearing up for the last leg

Packed up and ready to roll

Packed up and ready to roll

Prior to departing Weed, Russell treated us to his art exhibit at the local library.  At least a few of his paintings have ended up on BMW club shirts.

Russell's artwork displayed in the Weed library

Russell’s artwork displayed in the Weed library

When we headed out, we took Old Hwy 99 north towards Yreka.  After Yreka the side road is 263 and follows the Shasta River.  It was a very scenic road and a nice alternative to I-5.  About 15 miles from the border we bade farewell to Russell and picked up I-5 northbound.  For me this is no fun and I’m always looking for side roads, but we stayed on I-5 to make some time, stopping in Grants Pass for lunch and once more for fuel.

After some map consultation and debate, we agreed to leave I-5 for some more enjoyable side roads.  Just south of Eugene we took exit 163 towards Curtin, and jumped onto the Territorial Hwy.  We passed Lorane, Veneta and Elmira.  I was pleasantly surprised as we passed the King Estate Winery, a vineyard I have been wanting to visit, but have not had the chance so far.  We were too pressed for time and too messy to enjoy a wine tasting, so we noted the location for a future visit.  The road was scenic and much more pleasant than I-5.        https://www.kingestate.com/

King Estate from the road (Photo downloaded from Yelp)

King Estate from the road (Photo downloaded from Yelp)

King Estate Vineyards (another Yelp photo)

King Estate Vineyards (another Yelp photo)

We made our way over to 99W and followed that up through Junction City and Corvallis, then 233 to Dayton, passing several vineyard signs nearly every mile.  This is a very beautiful area, with smaller roads, vineyards, and slower traffic than I-5.  The sun was getting lower and the temperature began to drop, calling for another garment adjustment.

Four Graces tasting room in Dundee (Photo from the website)

Argyle tasting room in Dundee (Photo from the website)

At Dayton we picked up 99W again, and passed through Dundee and Newberg, pretty much ground zero for the Willamette Valley wine country.  On 99W through Dundee you pass the Argyle and Four Graces tasting rooms.

Four Graces in Dundee (website photo)

Four Graces in Dundee (website photo)

Four Graces

Four Graces

In Newberg we turned onto the Wilsonville Road, a really nice motorcycle road.  By this time it was dark, and I was slightly concerned about deer in the road.  We continued on Wilsonville Road out to I-5 and took that into Portland.

The total hours in the saddle on the last day was about 12, with stops for lunch, fuel, map reading and ice cream.  Comparing my pre-departure odometer reading to the final reading upon arrival at my sister’s house, my bike registered a total of 1,266 miles for the trip.  All the bikes were slightly different, but in the ballpark.

The 1987 K75S performed well, averaging 55 to 60 mpg, with only the clutch cable issue.  Once the cable was replaced, all went well.  I will be putting together an emergency kit to carry on future trips.

The lesson for today:  12 hours travel time on a motorcycle is just a bit too long for me.  My hands and thumbs were sore the next day, so for future rides I will keep that in mind.

Posted in California, Cars & motorcycles, Oregon | 1 Comment

Redwoods Road Trip Day 5. Awesome Motorcycle Roads

An awesome road for motorcycles, California 36. We rode from the western end to the intersection of 3 northbound.

An awesome road for motorcycles, California 36. We rode from the western end to the intersection of 3 northbound.

We packed up and were on our way out of Eureka by just past 8 am.  As with all three days in Eureka, we rode out in low hanging fog and mist so thick it required many swipes of my face shield.  I could have used tiny windshield wipers.  Not far south the fog began to clear.

Our route. 36 east to 3 north. Then Gazelle Callahan Rd to Weed.

Our route. 36 east to 3 north. Then Gazelle Callahan Rd to Weed.

If you google “best motorcycle roads”, you will surely find California 36.  We headed south from Eureka and turned eastbound onto 36 at Alton.  The western most part of 36 is just as pretty and has more twists than The Avenue of the Giants.  It was really a nice ride as we gained altitude and the fog started to drop away.  We passed the Grizzly Creek Redwoods State Park and climbed up the Chalk Mtn range.  We saw several deer along the side of the road.

Looking back down into the foggy valley from near the top of the Chalk Mountains along CA 36

Looking back down into the foggy valley from near the top of the Chalk Mountains along CA 36

At the top we looked back to see the fog down below and the sun coming out.  We stopped to make the usual garment adjustments.  I had used my heated grips earlier, and we were now starting to shed layers.

Shedding layers after climbing out of the foggy redwoods on CA 36

Shedding layers after climbing out of the foggy redwoods on CA 36

My K75 looking east along CA 36

My K75 looking east along CA 36

We followed 36 east, passing Dinsmore, Mad River, Forest Glen and finally turning off 36 at 3.  My favorite part of this section of 36 was just west of Dinsmore.  As usual, the best motorcycle roads, the ones that are the most fun, are narrow and twisting, and impossible to stop for still photos.  A GoPro camera mounted on the bike would have been perfect.

Stopped at the intersection of 36 and 3. We headed north, and I removed my jacket liner.

Stopped at the intersection of 36 and 3. We headed north, and I removed my jacket liner.

We stopped again at the intersection of 3 to remove more layers.  We had left the redwoods behind and were into pine trees and farm land.

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We stayed on CA 3 for quite a while, stopping in Weaverville for fuel.  Hwy 3 passes along the west side of Trinity Lake and runs through the Trinity Alps Wilderness.  There were more great sections of road for bikes, climbing and winding through pines headed to the summit.  The section of 3 just south of the Scott Mountain summit was wonderful.  We made another stop descending down the other side, with a pullout wide enough for photos.

The pullout along Hwy 3

The pullout along Hwy 3

At the bottom, before reaching Callahan, we turned northeast off 3 and onto Gazelle Callahan Road, headed towards Gazelle.  The terrain had flattened out, with farms on both sides.  The roads were straighter as well.

Our destination was Weed, CA, and the home of friends of Joe and Katy.  Russell and Kathe graciously extended a welcome to our group of road weary travelers with 5 bikes.  At least we don’t have the loud pipes or late nights of a wild bunch, and truly live up to the Mild Bunch legend.  (I can’t take credit for that term, but like it enough to pass it along).

Jerome waits for me to photograph Mt. Shasta

Jerome waits for me to photograph Mt. Shasta

One quick stop along the road for a picture of Jerome with Mt. Shasta in the distance.

Looking east along Gazelle Callahan Road

Looking east along Gazelle Callahan Road

We pulled into Russell and Kathe’s place at around 3 pm and made ourselves at home.  We covered about 230 miles, and were on the road for 7 hours, with short stops only for fuel and garment adjustments.  We had to skip lunch, not finding any suitable options.  Today I learned what a tar snake is, and that it is very important to avoid them.

Russell is also a BMW guy and has a gorgeous bike that put ours to shame.  They also have a nice view of Mt. Shasta from their deck.

Russell and Kathe's beautiful home in Weed

Russell and Kathe’s beautiful home in Weed

Mt Shasta from the deck

Mt Shasta from the deck

A hummingbird

A hummingbird

We greeted Russell all wearing about t-shirts sporting Russell's own artwork

We greeted Russell all wearing our t-shirts sporting Russell’s own artwork

Team spirit

Team spirit

The back of our t-shirts with Russell's original artwork

The back of our t-shirts with Russell’s original artwork

Our host's beautiful bike

Our host’s beautiful bike

The final evening light on Mt Shasta

The final evening light on Mt Shasta

 

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